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Parkinson's

Parkinsonís Care and a Different Point-of-View

By Gayle Eversole

One of my teachers from years ago was quite a knowledgeable person, especially when it came to nutrition and health. 

From his point of view, Parkinsonís was directly related to nutrient deficiency, especially calcium, and a poorly functioning parathyroid gland. 

He found too that for these folks, potassium was very low, and so there was a problem with food allergy to dairy and cheese, indicating a calcium absorption problem. 

Additionally, according to Olree, Parkinsonís can be attributed to aluminum toxicity plus boron deficiency.  This can deplete serine metabolism, then leads to altered bromine metabolism.  Perhaps this is the pesticide connection to Parkinsonís. 

Non-allergenic calcium sources can be bone meal or oyster shell calcium.  I usually opt for the oyster shell type.  Other supplements need to be used and in may instances glandular products. 

Vitamin B complex is necessary for a healthy nervous system, but the non-allergenic sources often are difficult to obtain so here I often suggest bee pollen and Royal Jelly.  If this is the choice then test it first for reaction, especially if you have experienced a bee sting reaction.  Alfalfa and Spirulina are also very helpful because of the nutrients they supply. 

Calms Forte is a good homeopathic remedy to help reduce spasm.  Other herbs along with specific cell salts also can be beneficial. 

Look to Valerian Root, Catnip, Passion Flower, Lobelia, and Chamomile Help keep you relaxed throughout the day.  Try Passion Flower in the morning, Lobelia at lunchtime, Catnip with supper and Valerian at bedtime. 

GABA can be useful to help maintain undisturbed sleep. 

Sunshine is important too because of the need for Vitamin D.  Many providers suggest, based on current research, that a person with Parkinsonís can use up to 50,000 units of D3 each week.  Getting a 25 OH test can help you learn the current level of your D3.  It should be 50-80 in order to allow for reserve as you use it up for many functions in your body. 

As the sun can use up essential fatty acids, massaging the skin with Safflower, Sunflower, or Olive oils (or a blend) may help protect and regenerate skin and may help resolve wheat allergy. 

For more information or custom supplement regimens and health and nutrition education, please contact us.

 Copyright CHI 2010

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Low vitamin D levels 'linked to Parkinson's disease'
 
Vitamin D test Kit and High Quality D3 supplements can be ordered through CHI

Having low vitamin D levels may increase a person's risk of developing Parkinson's disease later in life, say Finnish researchers.

Their study of 3,000 people, published in Archives of Neurology, found people with the lowest levels of the sunshine vitamin had a three-fold higher risk.

Vitamin D could be helping to protect the nerve cells gradually lost by people with the disease, experts say.

The charity Parkinson's UK said further research was required.

Parkinson's disease affects several parts of the brain, leading to symptoms like tremor and slow movements.

30-year study

Having low vitamin D levels may increase a person's risk of developing Parkinson's disease later in life, say Finnish researchers.

Their study of 3,000 people, published in Archives of Neurology, found people with the lowest levels of the sunshine vitamin had a three-fold higher risk.

Vitamin D could be helping to protect the nerve cells gradually lost by people with the disease, experts say.

The charity Parkinson's UK said further research was required.

Parkinson's disease affects several parts of the brain, leading to symptoms like tremor and slow movements.

30-year study

The researchers from Finland's National Institute for Health and Welfare measured vitamin D levels from the study group between 1978 and 1980, using blood samples.

They then followed these people over 30 years to see whether they developed Parkinson's disease.

They found that people with the lowest levels of vitamin D were three times more likely to develop Parkinson's, compared with the group with the highest levels of vitamin D.

Most vitamin D is made by the body when the skin is exposed to sunlight, although some comes from foods like oily fish, milk or cereals.

As people age, however, their skin becomes less able to produce vitamin D.

Doctors have known for many years that vitamin D helps calcium uptake and bone formation.

But research is now showing that it also plays a role in regulating the immune system, as well as in the development of the nervous system.

Vitamin target

Writing in an editorial in the US journal Archives of Neurology, Marian Evatt, assistant professor of neurology at Emory University School of Medicine, says that health authorities should consider raising the target vitamin D level.

"At this point, 30 nanograms per millilitre of blood or more appears optimal for bone health in humans.

"However, researchers don't yet know what level is optimal for brain health or at what point vitamin D becomes toxic for humans, and this is a topic that deserves close examination."

Dr Kieran Breen, director of research at Parkinson's UK, said: "The study provides further clues about the potential environmental factors that may influence or protect against the progression of Parkinson's.

"A balanced healthy diet should provide the recommended levels of vitamin D.

"Further research is required to find out whether taking a dietary supplement, or increased exposure to sunlight, may have an effect on Parkinson's, and at what stage these would be most beneficial."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/10601091.stm

http://naturalhealthnews.blogspot.com/2008/06/parkinsons-and-drug-pesticides.html

For More information about Motor Neuron Disease (MND) please see Steve Shackelís ALS site.